Tuesday, September 27

Tag: stellar black hole

NASA has provided the noises of a black hole 200 million light-years away.
News, Science

NASA has provided the noises of a black hole 200 million light-years away.

Any 'Alien' fan who fears the Xenomorph will tell you that sound does not exist in space. The trouble is, that's not entirely correct. NASA published this unnerving sound sample of a black hole in May, during black hole week, demonstrating that space does generate a lot of noise, depending on where you look and how you analyze it. The video depicts the sounds of a gigantic black hole in the Perseus galaxy cluster, which is more than 200 million light-years away from Earth. NASA is listening to the vacuum. https://twitter.com/NASAExoplanets/status/1561442514078314496?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1561442514078314496%7Ctwgr%5Ebb29b13bc891f5900437deec2899fb8bfc6e6933%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Finterestingengineering.com%2Fscience%2Fnasa-released-t...
Berkeley researchers create a low-cost, simple method for carbon collection and storage.
Amazing, News, Science

Berkeley researchers create a low-cost, simple method for carbon collection and storage.

As the United States and other countries work tirelessly to cut greenhouse gas emissions, one of their main objectives is to capture carbon dioxide from smokestacks. Now, Berkeley scientists have created a low-cost, simple, and energy-efficient method to accomplish that goal using inexpensive polymer melamine. a flexible procedure with a wide range of uses The method is so adaptable, according to the researchers, that it might even be scaled down to absorb carbon dioxide emissions from vehicle exhaust or other mobile sources. The new material is also easy to create and find, which is the best part. VISA ALSO "We wanted to consider a carbon capture material that came from sources that were extremely affordable and simple to obtain. So, we chose to begin with melamine," said Jeffrey Re...
For the first time ever, X-rays have been seen coming from behind a black hole.
News, Science

For the first time ever, X-rays have been seen coming from behind a black hole.

While analyzing the X-rays from the supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years away, scientists at Stanford University noticed a peculiar pattern. It appears that the black hole is ejecting these rays into the universe surrounding it. The observer, Dan Wilkins, observed several exciting but standard brilliant X-ray flares. When more X-ray flashes appeared, they were later, smaller, and had different "colors" than the intense flares, which caught the telescopes by surprise. Such a phenomenon had previously been theorized to exist and is explained by the fact that, just as observed by scientists, dazzling flares of X-ray emissions are produced as gas sinks into a supermassive black hole. Then, after the flares died down, brief X-ray bursts were seen. T...