Tag: gene editing

In China, researchers supposedly develop a new ‘controllable, reversible’ gene-editing process.
News, Science

In China, researchers supposedly develop a new ‘controllable, reversible’ gene-editing process.

Using CRISPR technology, scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) are said to have devised a new "controllable, reversible, and safer" gene-editing strategy. According to an article published on Wednesday in the South China Morning Post newspaper, the Cas13d-N2V8 system demonstrated a considerable reduction in the amount of off-target genes and no observable collateral damage in cell lines and somatic cells, indicating its future potential. According to the researchers, the novel strategy using the Cas13 enzyme to target RNA is safer because RNAs are transient molecules that only exist in the cell for a brief amount of time and are not integrated into the genome. "The Cas13 gene editing approach is safer, and the effects are more manageable and short-lived," said Yang H...
Bioengineers create bionic 3D cameras that have bat sonar and bug eyes.
Innovation, News, Science

Bioengineers create bionic 3D cameras that have bat sonar and bug eyes.

According to a press release from the university, UCLA bioengineers have created a new class of bionic 3D camera systems that can accurately mimic the multiview vision of flies and the natural sonar sensing of bats. The camera can identify concealed things. The new camera uses computational image processing to determine the size and shape of things that are concealed behind or around corners. The new gadget makes use of a sonar technique similar to echolocation used by bats. High-frequency squeaks made by bats are picked up by human ears after bouncing off their surroundings. In order to establish where things are, what is in the way, and the proximity of possible prey, they compare differences in how long it takes for the echo to reach them and the strength of the sound. In contra...
Long-term use of CRISPR gene editing could lead to the development of cancer.
Health, News

Long-term use of CRISPR gene editing could lead to the development of cancer.

There is a good chance that you are familiar with CRISPR if you have an interest in either medical or molecular biology (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). It is a method of editing the genome that, at its most fundamental level, enables researchers to modify the function of genes and cut any genetic material they choose. There have been multiple methods developed for editing the genome, with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene scissors (CRISPR-associated protein 9) being the one that has seen the most widespread application. It has been shown to be useful in a wide variety of applications and shows promise in the treatment of a wide range of illnesses and infections. It appears to be quite effective, doesn't it? A recent study suggests, however, that this might not be the ...